Video stuff

I found a really cool Final Cut Pro plugin that puts a motion tracked point on your video and builds out a title that moves with the tracked point. I’ve experimented with it a bit and I think I’ll be able to use it to point out people and other points of interest in my videos. The only problem I’ve found with it is that if the point you’re tracking is even briefly obscured, it will lose tracking and its mind.

2018 Look Back

2018 started out pretty shitty. I was unemployed, and my unemployment insurance had run out. Depressed due to the long employment search and other things, I started the year out of shape and overweight, only to be hit with two massive bouts of sickness that pretty much wiped out my winter training and dieting, meaning I hit the racing season with very few miles under my belt and a lot more fat under there.

I got a job in February, and while it was interesting the pay was quite low – I’d actually earned more as a full timer with benefits in 2001 than I was earning as an hourly contractor with no benefits at this job. So midway though the year I left that job for another which paid much better. I hate to be a job hopper like that but the difference in pay was hard to believe.

Because of the reduced financial circumstances this year, I didn’t do a lot of the “away” things I’ve done in previous years – no TC Surfski Immersion Weekend, no Canadian Surfski Champs, no Gorge, no Lighthouse to Lighthouse. Instead I concentrated on doing as many NYMCRA races as possible, even camping out to save money instead of getting hotels for away races. I did several races I’ve never done before, including the two days of Madrid and the lovely Blue Mountain Lake race.

Even better, the USCA national championship races were held in Syracuse. I had two really good 10 mile races – unfortunately both races were 12 miles. Both times I lead a pack of racers for the first 10 miles, then faded and got passed by all of them in the last 2 miles. Definitely something to work on this year.

I started the season completely out of shape with the intention of racing my way into shape, hoping to peak with the USCA Champs. It worked pretty well, and in spite of my tactical errors there, I had a really good race at Long Lake. I was hoping to continue with the final race of the season, the Seneca Monster, but it got cancelled.

In other good news, I really dialed in my video production workflow, aided by the fact that I now have a high end iMac. Also, I got a really amazing carbon fibre GoPro mount for the front of my kayak – not only lighter than my older aluminum one, but also more aerodynamic. After the end of the season, GoPro released a new camera, the Hero 7 Black, with a much touted “Hyper Stabilization” mode. I bought one and tried it out and it is pretty amazing. I can’t wait to use it for races next year.

I also bought a new boat – I did some side work for a pilot friend of mine and used part of the money to buy a V8 Pro, a more stable boat than my V10 Sport, but still pretty fast. During interval workouts on the bay, I found I could just put the power down instead of bracing and trying to keep upright.

One of my daughters got engaged this year. I really like her fiance and they seem really good together.

Both of my parents had health setbacks this year. I think this coming year’s travel plans will have to mostly involve visiting them.

Blue Mountain Lake Buoy Race (aka BluMouLA BuFuRa)

Another weekend, another NYMCRA kayak points race. This is one I haven’t done before, but it advertises itself as “The Prettiest Darn Race In America”. It’s a bit far but Jim and I decided to car pool up and back on the same day, which is a bit grueling but it’s ok with two of us sharing the driving and napping while the other drives, and that saves a bunch of money and time away from home. So we met at 5:00 am at a restaurant parking lot. We ended up arriving before 9:00 am, so we probably could have cut it a bit closer and got a few more minutes sleep.

The course is kind of complicated – you go down through a couple of passages into two other lakes and back, and then you go around the periphery of Blue Mountain Lake with buoys forcing you deep into several bays. I’ve never done the race before, so I went into Garmin Connect and tried to create a “Course” of the race it. This was a bit risky – I’ve used saved courses before a few times (mostly to compete against my previous times and track how far I have to go) and about 1/2 the time my GPS has frozen up.

Also, I discovered that while I remembered to take my two GoPros off the charger this morning, I somehow forgot to bring the waterproof case for the one I mount up front, so no split screen in this week’s video.

There was a also bit of a westerly or north westerly breeze, which kicked up small waves. Eric was paddling his new V10, and when he was warming up he wasn’t hugely confident at first. He took out the seat pad to improve the stability but he was still wondering if he could get through it without swimming.

The other complication of this race is that they don’t use any sort of start waves. They launch all competitors, no matter what type of boat they’re in and which length course they’re doing, all at once. This year they had over 90 boats, so it was a bit chaotic.

And they’re off

The starter was out in a guide boat ahead of us, which is kind of novel. And when he gave the signal, a massive wall of boats heading in all directions. Or at least two main directions – one for the 14 and 7 mile races, and one for the 1.5 mile race.

Jim M and Jan W took off right in front of me, while Roger and Jim P in their K-2 were off to one side near a C-4. Right in front of me was a guy I didn’t know in a black V10 GT (John Redos). I thought I might be able to hold his wake because his technique wasn’t great – from behind it looked like he had very little rotation and was pulling with his arms, and his hands were too low. But what he didn’t have in technique, he did have in “engine”. While I was riding his wake, a white V10 came through, paddled by David V and was a few boat lengths ahead of us. Soon afterwards, a black V10L came through – that was Jim F who I had a bit of a battle with at Long Lake last year. But I’d heard that he was only doing the 7 mile race. But since he was passing John and I had managed to hold his wake for quite some time last year, I figured I’d move over to his wake. I got a tap on the stern that let me know that Eric was riding my wake.

We rounded the first point and I lost both wakes. But the waves smoothed out a bit, and inevitably Eric was now able to put down some power and he moved past me and caught the three boats in front of me. From my viewpoint it looked like they were almost but not quite in a pack.

The first buoy and Eagle Lake

But then we approached the entrance to the passage to Eagle Lake. Those of us on the 14 mile race were supposed to go straight and the people on the 7 mile race were supposed to go around a buoy that was off to our right and then head right. Those of us going straight were supposed to ignore the buoy, but evidently David and John had missed that part of the pre-race meeting.
So they all went off line to go around the buoy, and from my viewpoint it looked like Jim going to the left of the buoy kind of cut off John going to the right of the buoy and John either followed him a bit to the right or was unable to cut back. But then he got back on track and got back on the proper line. I was bitterly disappointed that even with all the ground he’s lost by this mistake I couldn’t catch him. But now David was a few boat lengths ahead of Eric, and John was a few boat lengths behind Eric.

After this point, I just kept losing more and more ground to these guys. The passage to Eagle Lake narrowed down more and more until there was a nice little bridge and then it widens out again. But at least I could still see the guys ahead of me.

Nothing much happened on the lake. I kept a good eye on the guys in front of me to see exactly where they disappeared into the passage to Utowana Lake. And they did pretty much disappear. The passage is very narrow and twisty and they were out of view almost as soon as they hit it.

Passage to Utowana Lake

The passage was very pretty, and reminded me of some of the places I did canoe trips like Algonquin Park. But just as I was getting to the outlet I saw a big rock flanked by smaller rocks straight ahead, and I was wondering how I was going to navigate that when I got a bit closer and I saw a buoy on the far right and a nice clear passage in that direction.

Out on the lake, I could see a point that I knew for sure was the one I was going to be rounding, but the guys ahead of me were a bit of the left of the direct line. Not sure why they were doing that, but going a direct line didn’t buy me much time.

I rounded another point, and now I can see the first pack of boats coming in the other direction. The C-4 was leading, with Jim on their side wake and Jan on their stern wake.

Not too much later, Roger and Jim P came by in their V8-Double K-2.

Some time later, Eric came by, followed pretty closely by John. Close, but not directly on his wake. Then a bunch of boat lengths behind was David. Since he’d been in front of Eric earlier, I was hoping he was blowing up enough that maybe I could catch him eventually. Spoiler alert: that didn’t happen.

I reached the first buoy that I was actually supposed to round. It was gold in color and very easy to see from a long way away. It actually turns out to be a space hopper – you know those bouncy balls that kids sit on and bounce across the room on. The handle was how they were tied to the anchor rope, which is why the actual decoration isn’t visible until you’re almost there.

But rounding the buoy gave me a chance to see exactly where I stood. And it was now obvious that David was 3 or 4 minutes ahead of me, and there was a big pack of C-2s and one K-1 about 3 or 4 minutes behind me. So really as long as I didn’t give up, I wasn’t going to pass anybody and nobody was going to pass me. So think of the rest of my race as sightseeing while experiencing the pain of being at the anaerobic threshold.

Back to Blue Mountain Lake

By the time I rounded the last point and could see the end of Utowana Lake, I could barely see where Eric and the guys were disappearing. But I could, so I headed directly to the outlet. Once again through the narrow and twisty passage to Eagle Lake, thankful that nobody was coming in the other direction.

I don’t even remember if I could see the other paddlers on Eagle Lake, but there was a power boat coming out of the passage from Blue Mountain Lake so it wasn’t hard to find. There were spectators on the bridge I mentioned before, and they were cheering and clapping which was nice.

On the other side from the bridge, there were a couple of kayaks who I don’t think were racing, and a sailboat that was taking back and forth in this narrow passage. I was really hoping they weren’t going to tack in front of me, and they didn’t.

I came out into Blue Mountain Lake, and I can see the point you’re supposed to go around, but I haven’t reached the buoy that we were supposed to ignore on the way out, and go around on the right on the way back. It seemed like a very long way out of the channel.

Around and Around Blue Mountain Lake

After I passed the buoy and turned, I immediately saw just beyond the point I just mentioned that there is a large white arrow on an island. I guess that’s where I’m supposed to go. So I paddled over in that direction.

I kind of knew that I was supposed to go between these group of islands and the shore. But for some reason I saw this gap between two islands and decided to head for it. (I think I might have seen Eric’s group through the gap.)
And as I got closer and closer, it was getting shallower and shallower, and I soon realized that not only had I made a mistake, but it was probably too late to fix it. I just squeaked over one log when I suddenly hit a very hard bump. I swore loudly.

I could see a point up ahead that I knew was where the next cove with a buoy was to be found. Dave disappeared around the point and Eric and John were coming out of it. Dave seemed to take a long time to come out again. After I rounded the point I could see why – it was a long way into the cove. The cool thing, though, was that upon leaving the cove there was a dock where there was a very prominent map of the next part of the course. I think they did that because there was a small cove coming up that we actually don’t go into. I rounded the next point and went into the big cove, and rounded the buoy. Then it was along the shore direct to the next one. For a change you could actually see this buoy from the last one.

Approaching the buoy, the wind seemed to kick up right behind me. Which was great, until I made the turn and now had to parallel the shore beam on to them with reflected waves. Ugh.

After rounding that point, there was a choice of going between Osprey Island and Long Island, or going between Osprey Island and the shore. In the pre-race meeting they’d mentioned that it might be more shallow and weedy between the islands, and also from the map it looked like it would be easier to see the buoy coming on the shore side, so that’s the way I went. I ended up being able to see the buoy from a long way off, but it looked strange. For one thing, it was round, rather than flattened on the bottom like how something floating in the water would look. I was so confused by that that I actually stopped to consult the little paper map I’d taped to the cockpit of my boat.

I still wasn’t sure, but I decided to press on. I noticed a small power boat heading from what looked like the gap between the islands towards this strange “maybe a buoy, maybe not”. Then I noticed they were waving a small flag. I took that as a sign that they were stationed there to lead people to the buoy, so I continued towards the gold colored thing.
When I got closer, I could see that it was a buoy, but it was dangling from a diving board on a swim dock rather than fully in the water, which is why it had looked odd. There was also another map of the rest of the course on the dock.

The rest of the course wasn’t actually all that difficult navigationally, because all it was was around the last point then directly to the finish. The hard part was remembering what the building at the finish looked like. There were two kayaks at the point, and one of them yelled that I was supposed to head to “the pavilion”. Well, one of the buildings looked more pavilion-ey than the rest, so I headed that way. But here the small waves became a factor again, and once again they were almost beam on. But at least there was very little reflection off the far shore because it was sandy rather than rocky.

It was somewhere on this last straight-away that I realized my GPS was frozen up. Up until that point, I thought I’d just been maintaining a very steady speed and heart rate.

I was really glad to be finished. That’s a long hard race, and I finished about 4 minutes behind David and about 4 minutes ahead of the next C-4, so I was pretty lonely out there. But I like the course, and I like the variety, and I’ll definitely be back.

Electric City Regatta 2018

Rocking Down To Electric Avenue Again

I did this race for the first time last year. The main things I already knew about what has changed from last year are that:

  • I’m slower than last year, due to a lack of winter base and having gained a bunch of weight.
  • Roger Gocking, who I beat just about every time we met last year has been beating me at every race this year. I got slower, I don’t know if he’s faster as well.
  • Eric Young has become a beast, and I’m unlikely to ever pass him again. I beat him here last year, and it might have been the only time I did.
  • Jim wasn’t going to take the top spot in my age class this year because he’s paddling in a double with Matt.

Jim and I car pooled, and we took my car because we didn’t have a lot of stuff for a one day out and back. Plus he didn’t have a boat because Matt was bringing the double. So we met at a Denny’s parking lot and he left his car there – I think he’s incredibly brave to do that, because it would be just our luck that they’d notice it was still there between breakfast and lunch, decide they need the parking space, and have it towed. Last year Jim had suggested I live my car in an even smaller parking lot and instead I had Vicki come and get it.

First thing that happened when we arrived at the race was I started setting up my cameras, and discovered that my GoPro Hero 5 Black had turned itself on in my bag, and had completely depleted the battery. Fortunately the gods of video were smiling upon me because sometime in the last few races I’d accidentally left a spare battery for the camera deep in my bag and it had a full charge. The sidecar battery I use might have kept it going for much of the race, but it’s way safer to have a full charge in both the camera and the sidecar so I really feel lucky that I had that spare.

Second thing I discovered is that Mike Finear was there – we don’t see him any many races these days because his work schedule is so crazy, but he’s a great guy and I miss paddling with him. If I’d known he was coming, I would have tried to car pool with him except he arrived kind of late so maybe it’s just as well. He said the decision to come had been kind of spur of the moment, which is why he hadn’t let us know he was coming.

So now for the all-important “scoping out the competition” phase. Like I said, I knew Jim wasn’t going to be in my class for a change because he’s in a double. Not that I really cared, except it does mean that I don’t automatically start my count back of where I’m likely to end up at 2nd place. There was Eric, who as I said is a beast and unbeatable by me – however he’s also not in my age class yet, likewise for Royal McDonnell and Jan Wachowiak. There was another guy in a beautiful black V10 GT just like Eric’s. I didn’t know him, but his hair was grey or silver so I figured he’s probably in my age class. Don’t know how fast he is, but when somebody is paddling a GT boat you can probably assume he’s fast. According to the results, his name is John Redos. And Dave Wiltey was there again. Last year he basically sucked wake until a few hundred meters to go, then out sprinted me, beating me by 4 seconds. I had to be alert to that tactic this year, since he’s pretty famous or infamous for it – and he had done it to be before in one of our few previous meetings. There was Greg Hewlett who I just connected to on Facebook – he’s got Dennis Moriarty’s old 2006 V10 Sport and he’s really fixed it up nicely, but he’s pretty new to surfski and I was hoping he wasn’t just spouting false modesty when he said that he’s still falling in a lot in it. There was also a guy in a Stellar SEI who I didn’t recognize and didn’t know where he was likely to come in – I’d mention his name, but he doesn’t appear in the results.

One difference from last year is that there didn’t appear to be any C-4s in the race. That’s a shame, because last year Dave Wiltey and I blatantly sucked wake off a C-4 for the first 10 kilometers until the C-4 decided to participate in the rescue of a C-2 that had dumped when a power boat had come by, even though there were already 3 or 4 other boats participating and some boats were already leaving the scene. Then Wiltey had sucked my wake until, as I mentioned above, he out sprinted me.

And We’re Off!

As expected, Jim and Matt went off like a shot. Royal and Jan weren’t far behind. The two black V10 GTs of Eric and John were neck and neck, and Dave Wiltey was with them. That was unexpected. I guess Wiltey didn’t get the memo of how much faster Eric is than last year and thought he could beat him again this year. Yeah, I was giving that about a 0.0% chance of happening. The only real surprise at the beginning was I couldn’t understand where Roger was. Last weekend he was ahead of me almost from the start, but he wasn’t there. I worried about it a bit until about 1.5 kilometers into it when he came gasping and grunting up beside me. But unlike last weekend (and Round the Mountain), instead of just letting him go, I got on his side wake. Up ahead we could see Dave finally thinking twice about trying to keep up with Eric and dropping back. It seemed like only a matter of time until Roger caught him, I was just hoping I could be there when it happened.

We were making really good speed upstream – it was obvious we had a tail wind, not least because it was so hot. But you could also see little waves coming upstream with us. But with the heat and the lack of breeze, I was getting sweat in my eyes. I was spending a lot of time paddling with one eye closed because of it, which makes it harder to judge positioning when you’re trying to ride wake. That’s not as much of a problem when you’re on the side wake, but we were coming up to Dave and there were a couple of buoys and some canoes around. I wouldn’t have put it past Roger to try and scrape me off on a buoy or a canoe – he tried to do that to me a year or two ago at Armond Bassett. So I decided the safe thing would be to be on his stern wake – it’s much harder to scrape someone off if they’re on the stern wake, and also I’d be denying it to Dave when we caught him. I ended up tapping Roger’s stern a couple of times. I’m not sure how it happened, but at one point I did end up on Dave’s stern wake and I tapped him as well. But I made up for it by coming through and taking the lead.

It’s a Long Hot Day

So basically the entire rest of the race was Roger and I swapping turns on the front and Dave on one or the other of our stern wake. After the turn, it was a relief to get some breeze in our faces and get the sweat dried so I could see. But that was counter balanced by slower speeds and this little waves that had been helping us along were now holding us back. I could see Mike was trying to catch the white SEI, and Greg was a bit behind him.

About 1/3rd of the way on the return leg I was leading our little pack of three and the wind seemed to be getting stronger. I decided to try to move over towards the shore to see if I could get out of the wind a bit. The canoes ahead of us were all moving that way and it seemed to make sense to me. But Roger comes huffing up the middle of the river passing me, and there was no way I was going to let him get away, and so I swerved over and jumped on his stern wake hoping that being right in behind him might give some shelter from the wind. Dave followed me. Weirdly, even though the river was bending very gently towards the right, he was leading us more and more towards the left. I don’t know if that was some strange tactic, or just an inattention to where we were going. Considering his years of experience, you have to think it’s got to be a tactic, but I couldn’t figure out what he was intending to do or why.

With about 4 kilometers to go, Roger put on a big burst of speed. I tried to keep up with him but I couldn’t do it. He told me after the race that he knew he couldn’t out-sprint Wiltey at the end, so he had to drop us both to make sure that didn’t happen. If I’d managed to keep up with him, it’s pretty likely that Dave would have as well. So I waved good bye and settled in to paddle as hard as I could. I couldn’t shake Dave, although I have to admit I didn’t try much other than grinding. I didn’t know what else to do. Last year he’d shown that he didn’t handle motor boat wakes very well, and I kept hoping one would come by, but “hoping for an miracle” isn’t exactly an effective race tactic.

With about 300 meters to go, Wiltey starts moving up beside me. I still have a nose ahead of his, so I tried a few tactics – first I swerved to the opposite side from him to get him off my side wake, but he moved with me and stayed there. Then I tried cutting over in front of him, trying to push him off the direct line to the finish. Then when I had pushed him almost completely over to the side of the river, I tried the swerve to the opposite side again. He came with me. But then he started sprinting in earnest, and this year instead of saying “I’ve got nothing left” and letting him go, I matched him stroke for stroke. So instead of getting a couple of boat lengths on me, he ended up barely edging me out. They gave him a 1 second advantage over me, but I don’t think it was that much. The nose of my boat was approximately level with his cockpit, so maybe a half a boat length advantage.

Some time after the race I saw a C-2 dragging that white Stellar SEI in. I’m not sure if there was anybody in it. I heard a rumor that the kayak paddler had some sort of medical problem like a heart attack or a stroke and there are three C-2s listed in the results as “provided rescue” so it sounds plausible. I guess that’s the problem with a sport involving highly competitive over-50 year olds.

So my take-aways for this race:

  1. Nearly everybody (except Eric) was slower this year than last year. Even Royal who is a much better paddler this year is 3 minutes slower. So the conditions were slower, so you can’t really compare times.
  2. I’m quite pleased with being able to stay with Roger so long, considering what problems I’ve had with him at previous races this year.
  3. I’m also quite pleased with how much better I did sprinting head to head with Dave this year. I normally have a terrible finish sprint, preferring to use every last bit of energy I have to try to grind people off. I guess all those short intervals this year have been helping.
  4. I’ve got to remember to keep spare batteries in my bag. And also take steps to make sure none of the cameras get turned on while traveling to the race.

That’s it. More when I have the video created and uploaded tomorrow.